Wurati

NAMED AFTER AN ABORIGINAL CHIEF OF VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

In 1831, Wurati, accompanied by his wife Trukanini and colonial official George Robinson, travelled through the area in an attempt to negotiate a peace between European settlers and Aboriginal Tasmanians prior to the outbreak of the Black War.

Today, this 2654 acre reserve provides a rich, varied and iconic landscape for a range of rare and threatened species, including masked owls, white-bellied sea eagles and yellow-tailed black cockatoos.  Its wet gullies and river valleys also provide refuge during hot weather, and the connectivity of landscapes with other surrounding nature reserves give species room to move in times of crisis.

The hills are clothed in expansive eucalypt forest and woodland. The forest is predominantly threatened blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus), with large, healthy old-growth stands present in the gullies and south-facing slopes of the hills. These gullies provide important refuges for the threatened Oyster Bay pine forests. Other rare and threatened species include healthy populations of Barbers gum and warty paperbark. The property also hosts the rare Tasmanian velvet bush and clubmoss everlasting-bush.

LATEST NEWS

Wurati is in remarkably good condition, with few major threats that need managing. Our priority is to work with surrounding reserve owners to ensure connectivity for species through the landscape.